The Treasure of the Fortune

Posted by Seoirse on 12/6/2009 in Commentary | Family Legends

During the year 1649, news of terrible new predations by the English spread across Munster. Cromwell himself had taken command of the New Model Army, and his “Ironsides” (as the men of that army were known) had proven invincible in combat against the poorly organized Irish. Yet in the far west – in Kerry – life seemed almost peaceful. However violent the reduction of Leinster may have been, Kerry remained at a distance and in relative peace. The Earl of Ormond presided as the King’s representative in Ireland at his seat in Kilkenny, with Murrogh O’Brien, Lord Inchquin in command of the Munster Army, and... Read More


Comments

Dominick

Posted by Seoirse on 9/16/2009 in Family Legends | Genaology

Why was Dominick Ferriter so important in the history of the Ferriter Family? In simplest terms, he was the first “modern” Ferriter. The evidentiary artifacts that are coming to light regarding the events of Dominick’s life bring to mind several ideas: one, that Dominick strived to conform in all matters save faith – which was not a problem during his lifetime in that Charles II and James II were at least “closet” Catholics themselves. Two, he strived to maintain his “Gentleman” status, probably to the detriment of the “cadet” line of his supposed half brother Maurice. These attitudes passed along to succeeding generations, led his... Read More


Comments

Ferriters of Long Ago

Posted by Seoirse on 6/2/2009 in Family Legends | Genaology

We all have pretty clear ideas or notions as to what our ancestors were up to during the past 150 years or so. This is true for those who stayed in Ireland as well as the immigrant families. Family stories, oral traditions, old papers and photographs all serve to support this knowledge and history, within our respective lines. But what about those who lived long ago? What was life like for the Ferriter family during the long years spent at home on the Dingle Peninsula in County Kerry? This is a picture much less clearly painted for most of us. There are periods wherein documentary... Read More


Comments

John’s Story: One of the Frozen Chosin

Posted by Seoirse on 11/8/2008 in Family Legends

The background doesn’t matter so much anymore. Let it be known that soldiers and Marines found themselves battling a nearly defeated enemy in Korea, as winter, 1950 descended upon them. As the frigid cold descended from Siberia, enormous armies of Chinese also poured into the Korean mountains, intent upon destroying all of the American Forces, be they Army or Marine Corps. On the Western side of the peninsula, the U.S 8th Army was smashed, and sent reeling southward in defeat. On the eastern side of the country, a combined force of USMC and U.S. Army infantry had closed in around a large reservoir, high in... Read More


Comments

Is é Seo Mo Scéal Agus Táim Ag Fanúint Leis

Posted by Seoirse on 7/22/2008 in Family Legends | Ireland

For the Feirtears, no doubt those years of famine, and the longer decades of poverty and degradation came enshrouded in grief and loss. Beyond that there was the family. For twenty generations perched at the tip of the peninsula, itself on the edge of the island, on a windswept and sometimes harsh landscape, a landscape possessed of a raw grandeur and sweeping beauty. Home.   Home. From Mount Brandon, westward down to the sea, along the rocky shore, with the small coves and harbors, and for some centuries the abandoned fortress, once the family’s seat and symbol of power. All lost, yet lingering in memory... Read More


Comments

Know Your Ancestors

Sister Helen Theresa Ferriter

photo b. October 8, 1870
d. November 17, 1945

Helen Theresa Ferriter was born in 1870 to immigrant parents from the Dingle Peninsula area of Ireland.  She was the tenth child of Nicholas and Mary Ann (Sullivan) Ferriter.  Her oldest brother, Michael James Ferriter, was 17 and working in the coal mines along with his father.  Her youngest sibling was John Joseph Ferriter, age 5.  Four of the nine children born before her had not survived childhood, with one dying as an infant and three dying as toddlers.  Barclay Village no longer exists. At one time, it was a very busy community that sprouted up in 1850 around the coal mines and the rail... Read More