Savage versus Civilized in the Ferriter Family

Posted by Seoirse on 9/30/2011 in Announcement | Commentary

Creation of the new Ferriter Family website moved me to a review of certain items that I had in hand, for inclusion on the site. A number of these are now posted as blog entries, including the following. None of these observations, speculations, and theories have been altered by the time that has passed between having been written and now…enjoy reading, and comment, please! Sometimes it seems as if the family is spit into two camps: The savage and the civilized. What differentiates these two aspects seems at root to be fundamental difference in how the individual regards the law. C: In the civilized camp,... Read More


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A Few Thoughts on Family History

Posted by Seoirse on 7/30/2011 in Commentary

Creation of the new Ferriter Family website moved me to a review of certain items that I had in hand, for inclusion on the site. A number of these are now posted as blog entries, including the following. None of these observations, speculations, and theories have been altered by the time that has passed between having been written and now…enjoy reading, and comment, please! Is there a limit to the value of knowledge that one may obtain,  learn, and hold onto, about one’s own family? What value does such information have in the first place? What boundaries does one set upon the idea of “family”... Read More


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Historical Notions

Posted by Seoirse on 6/30/2011 in Commentary | Ireland

Creation of the new Ferriter Family website moved me to a review of certain items that I had in hand, for inclusion on the site. A number of these are now posted as blog entries, including the following. None of these observations, speculations, and theories have been altered by the time that has passed between having been written and now…enjoy reading, and comment, please!     Across history, many families have produced successive generations of noteworthy individuals. As western history developed principally as an aristocracy/oligarchy, irrespective of national boundaries, finding sons, grandsons, and great grandsons of prominent individuals successively appearing in historical accounts should not... Read More


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Thoughts on the Matter of Ferriters and Islandman

Posted by Seoirse on 5/24/2011 in Commentary | Genaology

Creation of the new Ferriter Family website moved me to a review of certain items that I had in hand, for inclusion on the site. A number of these are now posted as blog entries, including the following. None of these observations, speculations, and theories have been altered by the time that has passed between having been written and now…enjoy reading, and comment, please! Having inherited the (not uncommon within the family) interest in Ferriter History, I have pursued many of the leads provided by those mentioned above, and a few of my own. I am not a historian, but as a student of history,... Read More


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Comments on the Genealogies

Posted by Seoirse on 4/30/2011 in Commentary | Genaology

Creation of the new Ferriter Family website moved me to a review of certain items that I had in hand, for inclusion on the site. A number of these are now posted as blog entries, including the following. None of these observations, speculations, and theories have been altered by the time that has passed between having been written and now…enjoy reading, and comment, please! Quite a few citations involving the Ferriters of the 17th and 18th centuries exist. That said, there are no birth marriage or death documents for any of these people, nor will there ever be. Records keeping within the Catholic communities was... Read More


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Know Your Ancestors

Agnes Theresa Ferriter

photo b. 1876
d. February 22, 1958

Agnes Theresa 'J' Ferriter was the twelfth child born to Nicholas and Mary Ann (Sullivan) Ferriter, Irish immigrants to America from the Dingle Peninsula area in Ireland.  Agnes was born when the family was living in Barclay Village, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.  Her father, Nicholas, and some of her brothers were working in the coal mines.  The family had moved around since their immigration looking for better jobs over the years.  Four of the twelve children born to Nicholas and Mary had not survived early childhood.  But, by this time, there were a number of young working adults in the family. Her family eventually moved back... Read More