The Captain of the Whip: December 10, 1941, Cavite, P.I.

Posted by Seoirse on 12/9/2009 in Commentary | Genaology

The following account is as written in my father's own hand after the action. His account is somewhat longer, and there are other parts of the larger story that may be posted on this blog later. I chose this date for this excerpt, as tomorrow marks the anniversary of the day upon which the events occurred. Most people know of the action recounted, which followed the attack on the base at Pearl Harbor by someting like 48 hours. Here is a piece of that history:             The Captain of the Whip:  December 10, 1941, Cavite, P.I. The commands: “General Quarters!”... Read More


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The Treasure of the Fortune

Posted by Seoirse on 12/6/2009 in Commentary | Family Legends

During the year 1649, news of terrible new predations by the English spread across Munster. Cromwell himself had taken command of the New Model Army, and his “Ironsides” (as the men of that army were known) had proven invincible in combat against the poorly organized Irish. Yet in the far west – in Kerry – life seemed almost peaceful. However violent the reduction of Leinster may have been, Kerry remained at a distance and in relative peace. The Earl of Ormond presided as the King’s representative in Ireland at his seat in Kilkenny, with Murrogh O’Brien, Lord Inchquin in command of the Munster Army, and... Read More


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On the Eve of a Trip to Ireland

Posted by Seoirse on 2/27/2009 in Art Gallery | Commentary | Genaology

One can wonder about the nature of “family”. Certainly shared personal experience, bonds of love, common values and bonds of place are fundamental to any acceptable definition of what constitutes a family. This explains why certain faith communities, military units, political cadres, and even work groups can attain a strong sense of being families. Sometimes these groups displace or replace blood relationship-based families in the lives of individuals. I have written before about the unique attributes of the Ferriter Family. In this context, I am defining the family in a very broad sense – that of a group of people who share certain genetic kinship,... Read More


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Woodstock 1969

Posted by Seoirse on 1/6/2009 in Commentary

When this blog began, the thought was to provide a forum for individual posting of Ferriter Family histories, anecdotes, and tales that might prove meaningful or entertaining for the rest of the family to read. I’m placing this little piece into the entertainment category, although it is good history as well. Note: The essay was originally written in 1993, fifteen years ago, but already then nearly 25 years after the fact. Most of the memories remain sharp in my mind to this day, but I’m thinking that back in ’93, these same memories were just a bit clearer. In Which Young George Goes to Woodstock... Read More


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Ferriter Heraldic Investigations

Posted by Seoirse on 10/14/2008 in Commentary | Genaology

Creation of the new Ferriter Family website moved me to a review of certain items that I had in hand, for inclusion on the site. A number of these are now posted as blog entries, including the following. None of these observations, speculations, and theories have been altered by the time that has passed between having been written and now…enjoy reading, and comment, please!   ARMORIAL SYMBOLS of the FERRITER FAMILY The Ferriter Family has been known in Ireland since one generation following the advent of the Normans, and in Kerry within another generation following. Although information regarding those who came to Ireland with the... Read More


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Know Your Ancestors

Sister Helen Theresa Ferriter

photo b. October 8, 1870
d. November 17, 1945

Helen Theresa Ferriter was born in 1870 to immigrant parents from the Dingle Peninsula area of Ireland.  She was the tenth child of Nicholas and Mary Ann (Sullivan) Ferriter.  Her oldest brother, Michael James Ferriter, was 17 and working in the coal mines along with his father.  Her youngest sibling was John Joseph Ferriter, age 5.  Four of the nine children born before her had not survived childhood, with one dying as an infant and three dying as toddlers.  Barclay Village no longer exists. At one time, it was a very busy community that sprouted up in 1850 around the coal mines and the rail... Read More